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By Frédéric Portal, baron de; John W Simons

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In Hebrew nb',r schlhe, to give the hand, forms the word mVu schlum, concord (Gesenius). SHE-MULE. The she-mule, woman says Horapollo, represents a barren (II. 42). The word disjoin, a "ns pud, a mule, signifies also to separate, to verb applicable to the separation of the sexes. EGYPTIAN GOOSE. The Egyptians, of son by ' tlie sayw Horapollo, represented the idea chenalopex goose. This animal exhibits Acconliiit,' to (i(w-iiiiis, llie letters lle])rew. JJu even gives examples 'u\ o ii"

Horus, the god of light, is sometimes represented under the form of a crocodile, with a hawk's head surmounted with horns, and the solar disk (Champ. , This confirms the assertion of Horapollo, that p. 120). the crocodile's eyes represented light, and his tail darkprofane, ness (I. or 68, 70). The Bible head ; and says : The ancient and honorable, he the projjhet that teacheth lies, he is the is the tail. ) FINGER. " of man''' (Horap. II. 6). AJinger designates the stomach " is what we find in the Latin " This," Lenormant, says » Salvolini, Trans, of Obelisk, p.

The Bible head ; and says : The ancient and honorable, he the projjhet that teacheth lies, he is the is the tail. ) FINGER. " of man''' (Horap. II. 6). AJinger designates the stomach " is what we find in the Latin " This," Lenormant, says » Salvolini, Trans, of Obelisk, p. Sacy, p. 37. Gesenius, verbo nn. 16 Akerblad, Letter to M. De EGYPTIAN SYMBOLS. 81 and French versions of HorapoUo but the Greek author was far from having so burlesque and inexplicable a thought he simply made use of a Latin expression, not understood by his translators; oroftaxov, in Philippe's The Jinger, says translation, means, as in Latin, anger.

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